Robert Matthew-Walker, Musical Opinion, Jan 2017

“What was so impressive about this performance [of Debussy’s Danse sacrée et Danse profane] was that the large string section (over 50 players) was not reduced, enabling the richness of Debussy’s wondrous orchestration to ‘sit’ splendidly as both a background and occasional foreground to [Elizabeth Scorah’s] outstanding playing. Indeed, for the first time in my experience, this masterpiece was revealed in all its inherent expressive colouration and emotional grandeur. The orchestra was expanded to 100 players (eight percussionists as well as timpani) for the final work – Ravel’s complete Daphnis et Chloé ballet. This is a score that would stretch the finest orchestras in the world, but it is rare indeed to encounter a performance of such total commitment and genuine, inherent musicianship as we experienced on this occasion.”

“What was so impressive about this performance [of Debussy’s Danse sacrée et Danse profane] was that the large string section (over 50 players) was not reduced, enabling the richness of Debussy’s wondrous orchestration to ‘sit’ splendidly as both a background and occasional foreground to [Elizabeth Scorah’s] outstanding playing. Indeed, for the first time in my experience, this masterpiece was revealed in all its inherent expressive colouration and emotional grandeur. The orchestra was expanded to 100 players (eight percussionists as well as timpani) for the final work – Ravel’s complete Daphnis et Chloé ballet. This is a score that would stretch the finest orchestras in the world, but it is rare indeed to encounter a performance of such total commitment and genuine, inherent musicianship as we experienced on this occasion.”

Robert Matthew-Walker, Musical Opinion, Jan 2017